Biodiversity Data Journal : Taxonomic Paper
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Taxonomic Paper
New report of two Cerambycinae tribes in South Korea: Stenopterini and Thraniini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae)
expand article infoSeunghyun Lee, Seunghwan Oh§, Jinbae Seung|, Hyunkyu Jang, Minhyeuk Lee|,#, Woong Choi¤, Seunghwan Lee|,«
‡ Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, Republic of Korea
§ Manseung Blgd., 49, Myeongseong-ro 149-gil, Galmal-eup, Cheorwon, Republic of Korea
| Insect Biosystematics Laboratory, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
¶ 1810-1502, 69, Sangil-ro, Bucheon, Republic of Korea
# Korea National Park Service, Wonju, Republic of Korea
¤ 305-403, Sechangnamsunhwan-ro, Namdong-gu, Incheon, Republic of Korea
« Research Institute for Agricultural and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Open Access

Abstract

Background

Despite the recent advancement of faunal research of longhorned beetles in South Korea, the number of tribes of Cerambycinae has remained at 16 during the last 40 years.

New information

In this paper, two cerambycine tribes, Stenopterini Gistel, 1848 and Thraniini Gahan, 1906, are reported for the first time in Korea by species Merionoeda (Macromolorchus) hirsuta (Mitono & Nishimura, 1936) and Thranius variegatus Bates, 1873, respectively. Morphological comments, biological observations and illustrations of both species are provided. An updated key to tribes of Korean cerambycinae is also provided.

Introduction

The subfamily Cerambycinae (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) is the second-largest group amongst six cerambycid subfamilies (sensu Nie et al. 2020: Cerambycinae, Dorcasominae, Lamiinae, Lepturinae, Spondylidinae, Prioninae), comprising approximately 1,700 genera and 11,000 species globally (Švácha and Lawrence 2014, Tavakilian and Chevillotte 2021). Cerambycinae is also the second-largest subfamily as well in the Korean fauna and is represented by 119 species from 16 tribes (Jang et al. 2015, Oh and Jang 2015, Niisato and Oh 2016, Lee and Lee 2016, Lee and Lee 2018, Lee et al. 2021). Even though numerous papers on their diversity (Han and Lyu 2010, Lim et al. 2012, Lim et al. 2013, Oh 2013, Lee et al. 2015, Oh and Jang 2015, Lee and Lee 2016, Niisato and Oh 2016, Lee and Lee 2018, Lee et al. 2021) and a few faunal reviews (Lee 1987, Lee 1982, Jang et al. 2015Lee 1987, Lee 1982, Jang et al. 2015), the number of cerambycine tribes has remained at 16 (sometimes 15, depending on the tribal classification, see Table 1) during the last 40 years. In this study, we add the tribes Stenopterini Gistel, 1848 and Thraniini Gahan, 1906 to the Korean fauna by species Merionoeda (Macromolorchus) hirsuta (Mitono & Nishimura, 1936) and Thranius variegatus Bates, 1873, respectively.

Table 1.

Tribal classification of Korean Cerambycinae by various authors (bold words indicate tribal names different from the current classification; * = tribe new to Korean fauna).

Lee 1982

Lee 1987

Jang et al. 2015

This study

Anaglyptini

Anaglyptini

Anaglyptini

Anaglyptini

Callichromatini

Callichromatini

Callichromatini

Callichromatini

Callidiini

Callidiini

Callidiini

Callidiini

Callidiopini

Callidiopini

Callidiopini

Callidiopini

Cerambycini

Cerambycini

Cerambycini

Cerambycini

Cleomenini

Cleomenini

Cleomenini

Cleomenini

Clytini

Clytini

Clytini

Clytini

Hesperophanini

Hesperophanini

Hesperophanini

Hesperophanini

Molorchini

Molorchini

Molorchini

Molorchini

Obriini (= Obriini + Stenhomalini)

Obriini (= Obriini + Stenhomalini)

Obriini

Obriini

Stenhomalini

Stenhomalini

Phoracanthini

Phoracanthini

Phoracanthini

Phoracanthini

Purpuricenini

Purpuricenini

Purpuricenini

Trachyderini

Pyrestini

Pyrestini

Pyrestni

Pyrestini

Rosaliini

Rosaliini

Rosaliini

Compsocerini

Methiini (=Xystrocerini)

Methiini (=Xystrocerini)

Xystrocerini

Xystrocerini

Stenopterini*

Thraniini*

Materials and methods

Samples used in this study were deposited in SNU (Seoul National University) and private collections of H. Jang and S. Oh. Photographs of dorsal and ventral habitus were captured by a Canon digital camera EOS 80d, Canon MP-E 65 mm f/2.8 1–5× macro lens or Tamron SP 60 mm F/2.0 lens mounted. Multiple image stacking was conducted by Zerene Stacker 1.04 software (Zerene Systems 2014; http://www.zerenesystems.com/cms/stacker). To examine male and female genitalia, the specimens were relaxed in distilled water for two to four hours at room temperature. Then the genitalia were separated from the last abdomen segment using a hooked pin or forceps, without removing the abdomen. Separated genitals were immersed in 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution at room temperature for eight to twelve hours, depending on the sample condition. For the illustration of genital structure, a microscope (DM 4000B, Leica Microsystem, Wetzlar, Germany) with a USB digital camera (Infinity3, Lumenera Corporation, Ottawa, Ontario) was used.

Taxon treatments

Merionoeda (Macromolorchus) hirsuta (Mitono & Nishimura, 1936)

Nomenclature

Hakata hirsuta Mitono & Nishimura, 1936: 34.

Hakata klapperichi Tippmann, 1955: 100.

Materials    Download as CSV 
  1. scientificName:
    Merionoeda (Macromolorchus) hirsuta (Mitono & Nishimura, 1936)
    ; country:
    South Korea
    ; stateProvince:
    Jeollanam-do
    ; locality:
    Geumja-ri, Busan-myeon, Jangheung-gun
    ; eventDate:
    17.vii.2019
    ; individualCount:
    11
    ; sex:
    9♂, 2♀
    ; lifeStage:
    adult
    ; recordedBy:
    S.H. Oh
    ; institutionCode:
    Private Collection of S. H. Oh
  2. scientificName:
    Merionoeda (Macromolorchus) hirsuta (Mitono & Nishimura, 1936)
    ; country:
    South Korea
    ; stateProvince:
    Jeollanam-do
    ; locality:
    Geumja-ri, Busan-myeon, Jangheung-gun
    ; eventDate:
    17.vii.2021
    ; individualCount:
    139
    ; sex:
    137♂, 2♀
    ; lifeStage:
    adult
    ; recordedBy:
    H. Jang
    ; institutionCode:
    Private collection of H. Jang

Description

Body length 10-14 mm (Fig. 1A and B). Head black, minutely and densely punctuated with sparse golden setae, frons with short, but distinct longitudinal median suture. Antennae black, slightly shorter than body length in male, slightly longer than half of body length in female. Pronotum black in male, orange in female, with two longitudinal row of punctuations present medially, moderately pubescent. Prosternum black in male, orange in female, anteriorly with shallow transverse groove and with pale setae, prosternal process well-developed with apex widened. Abdomen orange in female, dark brown with brighter posterior segments in male, sparsely pubescent. Scutellum almost semicircular, black in male, orange in female. Elytra metallic black, almost half as long as body length, narrowed posterolaterally with somewhat rounded and unarmed apex. Legs orange with distal half of femora black, moderately pubescent on fore- and mid-legs, densely pubescent with long setae on hind legs, hind femora distinctly swollen. Tegmen apically blunt with short incision on middle, parameres indistinct, apex with long and dense setae (Fig. 1C). Penis bullet-like with sharp apex, almost as long as dorsal struts (Fig. 1D). Ovipositor gradually and slightly narrowed towards apex, slightly bilobed at apex, apically hairy with short styli (Fig. 1G).

Figure 1.  

Merionoeda (Macromolorchus) hirsuta (Mitono & Nishimura, 1936). A, B Male habitus; C Tegmen; D Penis; E, F Female habitus; G Ovipositor.

Distribution

Korea (new record), China, Japan, Taiwan.

Notes

Emergence begins in early July in the southern part of the Korean Peninsula. Beetles are most active in warm clear weather and visit the male flower of Mallotus japonicus (Thunb.) Muell. Arg. The population size in the site seems remarkably high as 139 beetles were caught in a few hours. The number of males visiting flowers is approximately ten times larger than that of females.

Thranius variegatus Bates, 1873

Nomenclature

Thranius variegatus Bates, 1873: 196.

Thranius sapporensis Kano, 1933: 132.

Material    Download as CSV 
  1. scientificName:
    Thranius variegatus Bates, 1873
    ; country:
    South Korea
    ; stateProvince:
    Jeju-do
    ; locality:
    Namjo-ro, Jocheon-eup, Jeju-si
    ; eventDate:
    28.vii.2016
    ; individualCount:
    1
    ; sex:
    1♀
    ; lifeStage:
    adult
    ; recordedBy:
    Seunghyun Lee
    ; institutionCode:
    SNU

Description

Body length of examined female 13.4 mm (Fig. 2A and B). Head dark brown, densely covered with pale decumbent setae, frons with longitudinal median suture. Antennae brown, except for antennomeres VIII-IX white, notably shorter than body length in female. Pronotum dark brown, densely covered with pale decumbent setae. Ventrum light brown, densely pubescent with minute decumbent setae. Scutellum black, almost semicircular. Elytra dark brown, with L-shaped brighter marking near humeri, narrowed posteriorly, partly exposing posteromedial region of abdomen. Legs brown to dark brown, moderately pubescent with decumbent setae, hind femora slightly swollen. Ovipositor approximately 7.5× longer than wide, almost parallel on side, distinctly, but shortly bilobed at apex and with short apical styli (Fig. 2C).

Figure 2.  

Thranius variegatus Bates, 1873. A, B Female habitus; C Ovipositor.

Distribution

Korea (new record), Japan, Taiwan.

Notes

No additional beetles have been collected after the first discovery, though we launched numerous flight intercept traps every year at the same spot.

Identification keys

Updated key to tribes of the subfamily Cerambycinae in Korea (modified from Lee, 1987)

1 Abdomen not fully covered by elytra, abdominal segments partly exposed 2
Abdomen completely covered by elytra 4
2 Elytra posteriorly narrowed, abdomen posteromedially and posterolaterally exposed Thraniini
Elytra posteriorly shortened, abdomen posteriorly exposed 3
3 Elytal apex weakly angulated, hind legs with dense setae, female 4th sternite posteriorly with dense setae Stenopterini
Elytral apex rounded, hind leg sparsely pubescent, female sternite plain Molorchini
4 Antennomeres V-X flat, prominently serrate Pyrestini
All antennomeres uniformly filiform 5
5 Prothorax distinctly longer than wide 6
Prothorax not longer than wide 9
6 Prothorax slightly curved laterally, without lateral tubercles 7
Prothorax parallel-sided with strong lateral tubercles 8
7 Antennomeres III-XI with spine at inner apex Phoracanthini
Each antennomere without spine at inner apex Callidiopini
8 Hind femur thickened rapidly on apical half Obriini
Hind femur gradually thickened towards apex Stenhomalini
9 Compound eyes coarsely faceted 10
Compound eyes finely faceted 12
10 Prosternal process expanded, genae moderately wide 11
Prosternal process not expanded, genae distinctly short Hesperophanini
11 Pronotum with irregular transverse or longitudinal grooves on disc Cerambycini
Pronotum with regular punctation on disc Xystrocerini
12 Body more or less flat, elytra completely flat, except lateral margin in lateral view 13
Body almost cylindrical, elytra slightly convex in lateral view 17
13 Metaventrite expanded towards mesocoxal cavity, mesocoxal cavity closed Cleomenini
Metaventrite not expanded towards mesocoxal cavity, mesocoxal cavity opened 14
14 Antennomere III-IX with black setae on apical half; elytra sky-blue with black markings Compsocerini
Antennomere III-IX without black setae; elytra not sky-blue 15
15 Prothorax laterally without tubercle Callidiini
Prothorax laterally with spine-like tubercle 16
16 Hind tibia flat, elytra green or metallic navy with two yellow bands Callichromatini
Hind tibia cylindrical, elytra black and red
17 Metepimeron expanded towards abdominal sternite Clytini
Metepimeron not expanded towards abdominal sternite Anaglyptini

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Biological Resources (NIBR), funded by the Ministry of Environment (MOE) of the Republic of Korea (NIBR201601203, NIBR202002205) and Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF2020R1I1A206948412).

References